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Gitanjali saw a real-world problem in the Flint Water Crisis and was inspired to create a way to help: her award-winning Tethys device. Rao is younger than most scientists as they begin their careers, but she has no plans to stop. In addition to that, the finalists had to pair up and compete in two additional challenges that required combining multiple 3M technologies to solve real-world problems. Biographie. in the U.S., so Rao’s device could save a lot of time and money for both municipalities and residents. Of course, getting her prototype required some tenacity and persistence on Rao’s part. Gitanjali Rao. But Rao still had to invest a great deal of time and experimentation to get her prototype to the point where she could win the prize. In it, the carbon nanotube cartridge is extremely sensitive to any changes in electron flow. Tethys, Gitanjali Rao's lead … "I had so many failures when I was doing my tests. "It's not hyperbole to say she really blew us out of the water," Brian Barnhart, a school superintendent in Illinois and one of the 3M judges, told ABC. This information is shared with social media, sponsorship, analytics, and other vendors or service providers. The city of Flint disconnected from Detroit’s water line as a cost-cutting measure and began to draw water from the Flint River in April 2014. To put that in perspective: Lead-contaminated water is classified as hazardous waste by the EPA at only 5,000 ppb. Inspired by carbon nanotubes that are sensitive enough to detect toxic gases in the air, she realized she might be able to use similar technology to create a lead-detecting test for water. Sie lebt in Lone Tree in Colorado und ist Schülerin der STEM School Highlands Ranch) (Stand 2020). “I learned to be diligent and persistent from Dr. Shafer. Her goal is "to save lives and make the world a better place. Gitanjali Raos Eltern Bharathi und Ram Rao stammen aus Indien. 11-year-old girl with a mind for science, Gitanjali Rao. While it may seem unnecessary to create a new lead testing device, it turns out that testing for lead in the water is not as easy as it seems and can cost a lot of money and require multiple tests. ?But 14-year-old Gitanjali Rao came up with a solution to this serious problem. “I started following the Flint water crisis two years ago when I was nine,” said Gitanjali Rao. . Rao’s device, which she named “Tethys,” after the Greek goddess of water, is an ingenious arrangement of the following components: a disposable cartridge that holds chemically treated carbon nanotubes, an signal processor using the coding language Arduino with a Bluetooth attachment, and it links up to a smartphone app that displays the results. Rao’s device relies upon the relatively new field of nanotechnology. Elle remporte le Challenge Discovery 3M du jeune scientifique en 2017. The young Rao’s device, which she named “Tethys,” after the Greek goddess of water, is an ingenious arrangement of the following components: a disposable cartridge that holds chemically treated carbon nanotubes, an signal processor using the coding language Arduino with a Bluetooth attachment, and it links up to a smartphone app that displays the results. Shafer helped me so much throughout this whole journey. And at home, Gitanjali asked her parents to create a “science room” in their Colorado home for her to do just that. For Gitanjali Rao, her hobby was a bit more specific. Her device, called Tethys, detects lead in water faster than anything else available in the market today. "A Young Innovator's Guide to STEM" creates an innovation movement for anybody under the age of 18. Because it’s a sizable problem.’”, He added, “Then you go one day at a time. Gitanjali Rao: It is how we have been brought up, so it is the core value for the common good of people. Tethys to ensure safe drinking water. It took several years, in which residents—including children—were turning up with mysterious rashes and other illnesses—before national attention to the crisis forced the city to admit it had a problem. “I was appalled by the number of people affected by lead contamination in water and I wanted to do something to change this,” she told ABC. Inspired by the Flint water crisis, 12-year old Gitanjali Rao created a cheap device to test drinking water for lead, and won a $25,000 science prize for it. "The other nine kids, they were also such amazing kids, so for her to stand out the way she did with a peer group like this is like an exclamation point on top of it.". "A Young Innovator's Guide to STEM" creates an innovation movement for anybody under the age of 18. But if the water is contaminated with lead, the water will react to the atoms, creating that resistance, or slowing, in the electron flow that the Arduino processor will be able to measure. Secondly, where does Gitanjali Rao live? Of course, getting her prototype required some tenacity and persistence on Rao’s part. Gitanjali Rao a été élue "enfant de l'année" par la parution qui dévoile, chaque mois de décembre, un classement des personnalités qui ont marqué l'année écoulée. 13-year-old Gitanjali Rao with her lead detection device named Tethys. She always listened to my failures and provided me alternate paths to keep moving ahead. "The other nine kids, they were also such amazing kids, so for her to stand out the way she did with a peer group like this is like an exclamation point on top of it. Named after the Greek Goddess of fresh water, Tethys is the brainchild of Gitanjali Rao. Michael Elizabeth Sakas/CPR News And she already has some advice for other scientists who wish to follow in her footsteps: "Advice I would give to other kids would be to never be afraid to try," Gitanjali said. 15-Year Old Genius Gitanjali Rao Is Time Magazine's Kid Of The Year 2020. But Dr. Shafer encouraged me to reach out to college professors and high school teachers for either space to perform my tests or to ask a question related to my research.”, Rao is younger than most scientists as they begin their careers, but she has no plans to stop. Though she lives in Lone Tree, Colorado, she was moved by the city’s plight, which she was introduced to in a school STEM lab, and through the news. Her … At the time, she had just learned about the water crisis in Flint, ... Gitanjali’s innovation proposes a new way to detect lead in drinking water with a tool she called “Tethys,” named after the Greek goddess of fresh water. If you click “Agree and Continue” below, you acknowledge that your cookie choices in those tools will be respected and that you otherwise agree to the use of cookies on NPR’s sites. The 3D-printed box is about the size of a deck of cards and contains a battery, bluetooth and carbon nanotubes. While Flint’s water crisis has fallen out of the public news cycle, its residents are still living with the aftermath of an estimated 40 percent of homes that drank and bathed in dangerously lead-polluted water. The book focuses on sharing a roadmap to innovation with a practical process for innovation and foolproof tips to compete in STEM and other contests. Rao was named America's top young scientist in 2017 and one of Forbes' 30 under 30 in 2019. Inspiration really struck after she watched her engineer parents test for lead in their own tap water, and decided to build a lead-detecting device that would be easy and affordable for anyone to use. Inspired by the Flint water crisis that happened in Michigan in 2014, Rao went on to give birth to her invention named Tethys. Gitanjali is also the inventor of “Epione”—a device for early diagnosis of prescription opioid addiction using … While she admits she was nervous at first to talk to “someone so knowledgeable and an accomplished scientist,” Shafer quickly put Rao at ease and taught her some valuable lessons. When Gitanjali Rao first heard about the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, she wanted to help in any way she could.At only 12 years old, she became the proud inventor of “Tethys,” a portable device that detects lead in water. While it may seem unnecessary to create a new lead testing device, it turns out that testing for lead in the water is. She taught me to reach out and ask for help. We have also curated a small list of achievements for our real life Sheldon Cooper aka Elle a 15 ans et vient de faire la couverture de Time Magazine. Gitanjali Rao, née le 19 novembre 2005, est une inventrice, scientifique et promotrice des disciplines STEM américaine. The book focuses on sharing a roadmap to innovation with a practical process for innovation and foolproof tips to compete in STEM and other contests. Gitanjali Rao is a sophomore and avid inventor from STEM School Highlands Ranch in Douglas County, Colorado. While she will be using a lot of her prize money for college, she hopes to use some of it to invest in Tethys to make it commercially available. Inspired by carbon nanotubes that are sensitive enough to detect toxic gases in the air, she realized she might be able to use similar technology to create a lead-detecting test for water. While Rao comes by her own skills honestly, it helps that her parents are also engineers, and that she has been given access to STEM classes and lab at school. "It's not hyperbole to say she really blew us out of the water," Brian Barnhart, a school superintendent in Illinois and one of the 3M judges, . Rao was paired with 3M scientist, Dr. Kathleen Shafer, whose focus is on developing new kinds of plastics. Named “America’s Top Young Scientist,” Gitanjali hopes to inspire other kids to get moving and make a difference in their own communities. During the selection process for TIME’s 2020 Kid of the Year you … ", , “Dr. Her father, Ram Rao, said, “We had to learn as she asked questions. Soon after, shockingly high levels of lead were found in the city's water supply. Rao's invention is named Tethys, after the Greek Titan goddess of clean water. ", Gitanjali Rao speaks onstage during The 2018 MAKERS Conference at NeueHouse Hollywood on February 6, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. The result won her $25,000 and the distinction as “America’s Top Young Scientist” in the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge. With Gitanjali's device, instead of taking days to send water samples to a lab, her device detects lead in seconds using carbon molecules -- and a mobile app. Shafer helped me so much throughout this whole journey. To put that in perspective: Lead-contaminated water is classified as hazardous waste by the EPA at only 5,000 ppb. When you put the cartridge in clean water, there’s no change in the electron flow and the smartphone app will show that it’s all clear to drink (or bathe) in that water. Gitanjali was named as America’s Top Young Scientist when she invented Tethys, a device that detects lead contamination in water, in … While the system sounds simple, it is quite a feat of engineering, especially for an 11-year-old. Still studying in 8th standard, and based in the US, 12-year-old Gitanjali Rao has invented a nanotechnology sensor-based water tester to detect dangerous lead contamination in drinking water. The nanotubes are then lined with atoms that are attracted to lead, which adds resistance as the electrons flow through, which can be measured. The seventh-grader from the suburb of Lone Tree, Colorado, realized that testing water for lead contamination was a rather complicated process and hence sought out to design a cheaper, more reliable and convenient method to do the same. Her goal is "to save lives and make the world a better place.". Before, I would hesitate to ask a question to someone whom I haven’t met before. See details. Fue reconocida como Forbes 30 U 30 por sus innovaciones. The Birth of Tethys. Gitanjali Rao was recognized as Discovery Education 3M America’s Top Young Scientist in 2017 and received an EPA Presidential award for inventing her device “Tethys”—an early lead detection tool. Gitanjali Rao, jeune scientifique et inventrice indo-américaine est, à 15 ans, la première personne à remporter le prix « Enfant de l’année » décerné par la revue Time. Hear from the 13-year-old inventor herself on how it works. Once Rao and nine others made it to the finalist round, they were paired with a scientist to help them take their idea from prototype to reality. In den vergangenen Jahren erfand Rao Techniken in mehreren Bereichen: So entwickelte sie mit zwölf Jahren ein kostengünstiges mobiles Gerät, das den Bleigehalt in Trinkwasser anzeigt. You can adjust your cookie choices in those tools at any time. Though she lives in Lone Tree, Colorado, she was moved by the city’s plight, which she was introduced to in a school STEM lab, and through the news. NPR’s sites use cookies, similar tracking and storage technologies, and information about the device you use to access our sites (together, “cookies”) to enhance your viewing, listening and user experience, personalize content, personalize messages from NPR’s sponsors, provide social media features, and analyze NPR’s traffic. Gitanjali Rao was recognized as America's Top Young Scientist and received an EPA Presidential award for inventing her device "Tethys"—an early lead detection tool. Gitanjali Rao speaks onstage during The 2018 MAKERS Conference at NeueHouse Hollywood on February 6, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. 2 min read 6.7 K Shares. As of 2016, lead-contaminated water is an issue for more than. As of 2016, lead-contaminated water is an issue for more than 5,300 water systems in the U.S., so Rao’s device could save a lot of time and money for both municipalities and residents. In her short life, she has used scientific creativity to address many real-world problems, like lead in drinking water, drug abuse, and bullying.

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